The latest in genetics and women's cancers

Judy Garber, MD, MPH, director of the Center for Cancer Genetics and Prevention at Dana-Farber

Judy Garber, MD, MPH, director of the Center for Cancer Genetics and Prevention at Dana-Farber

Knowledge of genetics and women’s cancers has come a long way in the 20 years since the BRCA1/2 genes were discovered. Scientists are able to identify more genes that can increase risk, leading to better prevention and improved treatment.

“One of the most exciting developments is the knowledge that patients with hereditary risk have tumors that are different biologically, and those tumors can be treated using drugs that we’ve never used before,” says Judy Garber, MD, MPH, director of the Center for Cancer Genetics and Prevention at Dana-Farber and one of the leaders in the Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers.

Garber recently participated in a live video webchat on the latest in genetics and women’s cancers. The chat included discussion about genetic risk, developments in genetic testing, and improved treatments for those who have hereditary cancers.

“More genes are being found and fewer families are having to wonder if there is something genetic that may increase their risk, or future generations’ risk, of developing cancer,” Garber says.

Watch a recording of the webchat below:

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